PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


I have decided to add further endings to the site on a monthly basis. The new position will appear at the beginning of each new month. You are invited to solve it. I will be pleased to receive feedback about the positions and the analysis. The solution will be published the following month with the new position. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but they will be relevant to the practical game. The site has over 400 chess endings and endgame studies and and has been running for over seven years. An explanation of the different types of endings is given below. Thanks for your support.

A database of chess endings.
Thanks to Valdir Uchoa Jr, Antonio Senatore and Fernando Rossetti.
THIS MONTH

POSITION 363

White to play and DRAW

 

FEN:8/3K4/2p5/4p3/2P5/1B3pk1/8/8 w - - 0 1:  

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

Solution for the above, plus new position: 1st JUNE 2005.


LAST MONTH, POSITION 362

Carl Schlechter, (1874-1918).

Grandmaster, World Championship Challenger, Editor, Problemist. Viennese player who at the start of the 20th century was ranked among the top six players in the world. In the first decade he had a string of tournament successes which led him in 1910 to challenge Emanuel Lasker for the World Championship. After nine games he led +1=8 but unfortunately he lost an exciting last game. So Lasker retained his title. Schlechter was the editor of Deutsche Schachzeitung and edited the last edition of Von Bilguer's Handbuch des Schachspiels. He was a popular player who died in tragic circumstances following the end of the 1st World War.

Schlechter vs Burn

Vienna, 1898

White to play and WIN

FEN:rr4k1/p5pp/5p2/1p6/2bNn3/P3P3/4BPPP/2R2RK1 w - - 0 1:

Burn had just played ...Bc4 thinking that the straight Bishop swop would lead to him winning the exchange for a pawn: 1.Bxc4? bxc4 25.Rxc4 and then the Knight fork ...Nd2 attacking the two Rooks.

But Schlechter turns the tables. By reversing the move order he gains an extra pawn.

1.Rxc4! bxc4

Black has to accept the Rook. Refusal leads to an early loss:

1...Nd2 2.Rb4 Nxf1 3.Kxf1 a5 4.Rxb5 +-;

2.Bxc4+ Kf8

3.Bd5! ...

Winning back the exchange with interest;

3... Re8

1...Nc3 4.Bxa8 Rxa8 5.Rc1 Rb8 6.f3+-;

4.Bxa8 Rxa8

5.Rc1 Rb8

6.f3 Nd6

7.Rc7 ...

White forces off the Rooks to maximize the advantage of the extra pawn.

7... Rb7

8.Rxb7 Nxb7

9.Kf2 Nd6 

9...g6 10.Ke2 a6 11.Kd3 Ke7 12.Kc4 Kd6 13.Nb3 Kc6 14.e4 +-;

Both players centralize their Kings. 

10.Ke2 Nc4

11.Nc2 Ke7

12.Kd3 Ne5+

13.Kd4 Kd6

If the pawns were on just one side of the board then Black may have had drawing chances. But he has to defend against weaknesses on both sides of the board.

14.Nb4 f5 

14...Ng6 15.Nd3 Nh4 16.Ne1 Nf5+ 17.Ke4 Ne7 18.Nd3 Nc6 19.h4 g6 20.h5 Ne7 21.Nf4 a6 22.g4 f5+ 23.Kd3 fxg4 24.hxg6 hxg6 25.fxg4 Ke5 26.Ke2 Ke4 27.Ne6 a5 28.Ng5+ Ke5 29.Nf3+ Ke4 30.Nd2+ Kd5 31.Kf3 Nc6 32.Kf4 Ne5 33.a4 Ke6 34.Kg5 Kd5 (if 34...Kf7 35.Nb3 Nc4 36.e4 Kg7 37.Nc5 Kf7 38.Kf4 Ke7 39.e5 +-;

15.Nd3 Nc6+

16.Kc4 a6

17.Nb4 Nb8 

17...Ne5+ 18.Kd4 a5 19.Nd3 Nc6+ 20.Kc4 g6 21.Kb5 Kd5 22.h4 Kd6 23.Nb2 Kd5 24.e4+ Kd6 25.Nc4+ Kc7 26.a4 Nd4+ 27.Kxa5 fxe4 28.fxe4 h6 29.Kb4+-;

  White now creates a passed pawn which puts the win beyond doubt.

18.Kd4 a5

19.Nd3 Nd7

20.e4 g6

21.e5+ Kc6 

21...Ke6 22.f4 Nb6 23.g3 h6 24.h4 Kd7 25.Nb2 Na8 26.Kc5 Nc7 27.Kb6 Ne6 28.Kxa5 Kc6 29.Kb4 g5 30.fxg5 hxg5 31.Kc4 f4 32.gxf4 g4 33.Nd3 g3 34.Ne1 Nxf4 35.a4 g2 36.Nf3 Nh3 37.a5+-; 

22.e6 Nf6

23.Ke5 Ne8

24.a4 Nc7

25.Nf4 Kc5

26.e7 Ne8

27.Nd5 Kc4

28.Nf6 Ng7

29.e8Q ...

29.Nxh7 Kb4 30.Kf6 Ne8+ 31.Kf7 Nd6+ 32.Kf8 Kxa4 33.Ng5 Kb4 34.Nf7+-

29...Nxe8 30.Nxe8 Kb4 31.Nd6 Kxa4 32.Nc4 Kb4 33.Nxa5 Kxa5 34.Kf6 Kb5 35.Kg7 g5 36.Kxh7 g4 37.Kg6 gxf3 38.gxf3 wins.

A superb technical performance by the Viennese Grandmaster. 

Gens Una Sumus
8X8 Basic Endings for Success

White to play and WIN  

 

 

 

The White King wants to invade on b6 to win the a6 pawn and the game. Playing 1.Kd6 followed by 2.c7+ will only lead to a draw.

If the White King goes directly to c5 then Black plays Kc7 and White cannot make progress. In order to win White has to "triangulate" with his King in order to lose a move:

1.Kd4 Kd8 2.Kc4 Kc8 3.Kd5 now if 3...Kc7 4.Kc5 wins. If the Black King plays to 3...Kd8 or Kb8 then White takes the opposition with 4.Kd6 and soon wins.

 

 

I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings found on the site. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have tablebases. In the days when we had adjournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. Fundamental Chess Endings (2001) by Muller and Lamprecht and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter and the earlier A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper are good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941,2003) recently revised by Pal Benko and Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which have been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked".

Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort.

John Nunn's Endgame Challenge (2002) is an excellent introduction to using endgame studies as a training tool. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972).
Pre 18/04/04 Archives

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01/03/05

Position 361

Rinck

01/02/05

Position 360

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01/02/05

Position 359

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16/01/05

Position 358

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19/12/04

Position 357

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12/12/04

Position 356

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05/12/04

Position 355

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28/11/04

Position 354

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21/11/04

Position 353

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14/11/04

Position 352

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07/11/04

Position 351

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Position 350

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24/10/04

Position 349

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17/10/04

Position 348

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10/10/04

Position 347

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03/10/04

Position 346

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26/09/04

Position 345

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19/09/04

Position 344

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12/09/04

Position 343

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05/09/04

Position 342

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29/08/04

Position 341

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22/08/04

Position 340

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04/07/04

Position 339

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27/06/04

Position 338

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20/06/04

Position 337

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12/06/04

Position 336

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06/06/04

Position 335

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30/05/04

Position 334

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23/05/04

Position 333

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16/05/04

Position 332

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09/05/04

Position 331

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02/05/04

Position 330

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25/04/04

Position 329

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18/04/04

Position 328

Em Lasker